Tradeline October 10, 2005

World Trade Center Alaska

Upcoming Events

World Trade Center Alaska invites you to attend our Luncheon

with Karen Matthias
Consul

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Canadian Consulate in Anchorage

Topic

"Canada's Economic Impact on Alaska"

When: Wednesday,
October 12, 2005

Where: Wells Fargo Bank (Northern Light and "C" Street), Fifth Floor
Time: 12 noon (doors open 11:45 am)

Fee: $20- WTCAK member
$25 - non-member

For more information
contact
WTCAK at 278-7233
or e-mail: info@wtcak.org

 


Premium Level Members

CEO Club:

FedEx
Horizon Lines of Alaska L.L.C.
Wells Fargo Bank Alaska
Lynden International  
Alaska Railroad Corporation
Russia Jet Direct
South Central Timber Development


Corporate:

3M Alaska
Alaska Airlines
Alaska Business Publishing Co.
Alaska Interstate Construction L.L.C.
Arctic Slope Regional Corporation
BP 
ConocoPhillips Alaska
International Telecom
UBS Financial Services
United Parcel Service


Contact Information

431 West Seventh Avenue, Suite 108, Anchorage, Ak 99501
Phone: (907) 278-7233,
Fax: (907) 278-2982,
Email: info@wtcak.org

Staff

Greg Wolf
Executive Director

Alex Salov
Office Manager

Peter Ratner
Program Coordinator

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Message from the Executive Director

Dear Member:

September was a busy month for the Center. The 1st Alaska-China Business Conference at the beginning of the month kicked off our “China Calling” program, an ongoing series of events and activities focused on expanding trade opportunities between Alaska and China. The conference featured a host of experienced ‘China hands’ who offered their insights and ideas on how to identify and pursue business opportunities in the world’s fastest growing major market.

Two weeks later, WTCAK led a group of business and government officials on a Trade Mission to China with stops in Shanghai and Beijing. The mission was timed to coincide with the 36th Annual General Assembly of the World Trade Centers Association, the organization to which WTCAK and some 300 other WTCs are members. This year, our colleagues at WTC Shanghai hosted the General Assembly. More than 400 delegates from around the world attended the event. The presentations during the General Assembly were focused on opportunities for small and medium-sized companies (SMEs) to participate in China’s growing economy.

Trade mission members participated in the General Assembly and met with senior American and Chinese government officials for briefings and to discuss Alaska’s export resources. Working in cooperation with the Alaska Seafood Marketing Institute’s China representative, the trade mission delegation also hosted an “Alaska Night” in Shanghai featuring a variety of Alaskan seafood. Nearly 100 persons attended the event, including a number of local seafood buyers.

A special report on the China conference and trade mission will be available in a few weeks and can be accessed at our web site (www.wtcak.org).
Also in September, Jim Kulas, Environmental Superintendent for Teck-Cominco Alaska, provided an update on the Red Dog Mine at our monthly luncheon meeting. Red Dog is the world largest zinc concentrate mine and Teck-Cominco is a major exporter of zinc and lead from Alaska.

Teck-Cominco’s investment at Red Dog is an excellent example of Canada’s significant participation in Alaska’s economy. Canadian trade and investment will be the topic of our monthly luncheon later this week, on 12 October, at the Wells Fargo Bank Building. Karen Matthias, Canada’s Consul here in Anchorage, will present the findings of a just completed study of Canada’s economic impact on Alaska. Canada is Alaska’s third largest trading partner and for many years has been a major investor in the state’s mining industry and other sectors. Don’t miss this important luncheon meeting.

Until Next Week,

Greg Wolf

Executive Director


Many thanks to new or renewing members. It is the support of our membersthat enables WTCAK to provide the information and services that help make trade happen

Foss Maritime Company
Udelhoven Oilfield System Services, Inc.
Alaska Supply Chain Integrators
International Data Systems, Inc.
Circumpolar Expeditions
Arctic Foundations, Inc.
Northrim Bank
Canadian Consulate in Anchorage
Mat-Su Borough
Patton Boggs LLP
Ms. Chong Sanders
Hotel Captain Cook
Consulate-General of Japan
Fairweather, Inc.
Alaska Airlines
DRven Corporation
Royal Norwegian Consulate
KPMG LLP
Consul of Seychelles
VECO Corporation
International Business for Women
Usibelli Coal Mine, Inc.
United Parcel Service
Pacific Rim Leadership
Alaska State Legislature
The Strategy.Biz, Inc.
American Marine Corporation


Canada Snapshot

The Government of Canada opened a new consulate in Alaska, headed by Consul Karen Matthias, in September 2004. The establishment of the office and Consul Mathias’ immediate active involvement in Alaska is clear recognition of the historically strong ties between Alaska and Canada as well as the increasing importance of trade and cooperation between the two. The Anchorage office is one of several new consulates the Government of Canada recently opened as a result of its national effort to enhance representation in the United States. Alaska has the longest border with Canada, 1538 miles, of any state.

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Source:State of Alaska, 2004 Export Report

A new economic impact study commissioned by the Consulate of Canada found that Canada's economic impact on Alaska is far reaching, touching industries as diverse as mining, retail, fish processing, and tourism. In 2004, Canadian companies in Alaska annually employed some 2,600 Alaskans. The direct and indirect total impact tied to Canadian economic activity in this state amounted to $330 million last year.

Between 1981 and 2004, Canadian companies invested $2.3 billion in mining and exploration in the Alaska. Annually, about 100,000 Canadians visit Alaska, spending $81 million in state. At the WTCAK Lincheon on October 12 Consul Matthias' presentation will highlight several success stories of this dynamic, but sometimes overlooked, trade relationship.